Five Properties of Chainmale

By Nicholas Hope

15 April - 9 May

PERFORMANCE TIMES

Monday – Saturday 7pm
Saturday 9 May 2pm and 7pm 

“They don’t want the truth. Don’t want honesty. Too confronting.”

Five men. Five worlds. In a seedy London hotel room, a trendy gallery in Oslo, the cafés of Adelaide, the streets of coastal Sydney and the waiting room of a criminal court, modern man grapples with his crumbling reflection.

Five Properties of Chainmale presents five variations on the theme of contemporary masculinity with not a bromance in sight. It is an excavation of the male mind across generations and time zones.

Confronting, uncomfortable and comical, Five Properties of Chainmale is written and directed by playwright and award-winning actor Nicholas Hope.

Produced by Arts Radar in association with Catnip Productions and Hope Productions. 

Director Nicholas Hope
Designers Tom Rivard and Tom Bannerman  
Lighting Designer Chris Page
Sound Designer David Kirkpatrick
Costume Designer Zora Milevska 

Producers Sam Hawker (Arts Radar), Cat Dibley (Catnip Productions)

With Alan Lovell, Dominic McDonald, Jeremy Waters, Briony Williams

TICKETS

 Single Ticket Prices
  Adult   $38
  Concession, Senior, Preview, Groups 8+   $30
  Under 30   $30

Transaction fees of $4 for online bookings and $5 for phone bookings apply

Phone bookings 02 9361 3817
Online bookings 

PERFORMANCE DATES
Previews 15 – 16 April
Season 18 April – 9 May

PERFORMANCE TIMES
Monday – Saturday 7pm
Saturday 9 May 2pm and 7pm

VENUE
SBW Stables Theatre
10 Nimrod Street
Kings Cross NSW 2011

Nicholas Hope played lead character in the cult Australian movie Bad Boy Bubby. If you’ve seen it, you won’t have forgotten it. Now he’s exploring masculinity in a provocative new stage play Five Properties of ChainmaleABC Radio National – Life Matters 

“Through irony, self-deprecation and humour we are willing to look just a little at the vanities, excesses and dangers of man’s love of himself (beautiful creature that he is!)” Australian Stage

“It’s refreshing to see such a concept tackled on stage, and Hope should be commended for this…he opens our eyes to a culture laced with narcissism, misogyny, furtiveness and more.” ArtsHub